Weaving Gold

Mokosha, Anastasia Sophia, and Me, Natalia . . . while the books are written

Eternal Entirety’s Longest Bridge

Four
furious
fabulous
fantastical
years I am astir.
Awakened by wonder.
Blown, cleaved, shattered asunder.
Creeping. Crawling. Leaping. Soaring.
Traversing, in dazed bewilderment,
Eternal Entirety’s longest bridge.
Beams break. Decks collapse beneath my feet.
Dumped. Swung in circles. I retreat.
No place to hide in transit.
Flailed. Flayed. Foresaken.
Impetus for Life
pulses, surges
purifies
pushes
on.

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Elusive Dream

Cars. Lawnmowers. Jets.
Unmelodic, disharmonious machines
disrupt my poem.
Persistent, distressing noises
destroy my peace.

If I listen with my eyes,
immerse myself in still waters,
equilibrium is restored,
For a moment,
desire to drown.

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Hope (not)

Foolish foibled fantasy
Encouraging lie
Faulty persuasion

masquerading as comfort
does not absolve wickedness

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Sister Wisdom Found

 

18077814Weaving together the stories of Diana Morgan, a low-rung Oxford scholar, and Myrina, founder of the Amazons, Lost Sisterhood is a tale of adventure, ancient secrets, love, and wisdom. I loved the book and marked several quotes. Today, I’m sharing a few favorites for Writers’ Quote Wednesday.

So now you know why I think all talk of borders and colors and nationalities is absurd. People try to pin you down on a map and paint you a certain color to make everything simple. But the world is far from simple, and intelligent human beings don’t like to be pinned down and painted by some hand in the sky, whether it belongs to a god, a priest, or a politician.


Anne Fortier
 grew up in Denmark, but immigrated to the United States in 2002. She holds a Ph.D. in the History of Ideas and co-produced the Emmy-winning documentary Fire and Ice: The Winter War of Finland and Russia (2005). Her first novel in English, JULIET (2010), was published in over 30 countries and became a New York Times bestseller.

Only kings are put in writing, you know. Kings and heroes. The rest of us are but fading echoes in the valley of eternity.

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Here, we chop wood to keep warm. If you think that’s amateurish, all I can say to you is this: You are more vulnerable than you think.


 

030816_1826_writersquot1.pngMy contribution for #WQW

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Shelfies are the new Selfies

I recently discovered that shelfies are a thing. Some definitions say that a shelfie is a picture of your bookshelf. A recent Mashable article described them as a photo of yourself with your bookshelf — book spines legible.

Shelfies must be the best trend ever. Tweet me your shelfie? @weavinggold Or, share a link to your Goodreads favorites page in the comments. I’d love to take a peak at your bookshelf. #RevealYourself

Some of my favorites live on my Kindle.
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For all the Frimes

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As a writer, I harbor a small hope that my words will live forever, touching future generations. With the superabundance of books, blogs, tweets, and quips in existence, my dream seems unlikely. While others will take charge (or not) of my legacy, I can keep alive the words of my favorite authors.

220px-Gelett_BurgessFrank Gelett Burgess (January 30, 1866 – September 18, 1951) was an artist, art critic, poet, author, and humorist. He is best known as a writer of nonsense verse and the author of the still in-print Goops stories, books about manners, for kids.

The Goops they lick their fingers,
And the Goops they lick their knives,
They spill their broth on the tablecloth –
Oh, they lead disgusting lives!

He coined the term blurb and wrote his own dictionary.

Some excellent and useful words:

alibosh – glaringly obvious falsehood or exaggeration

drillig – a tiresome lingerer, one who talks too long

flooijab – an apparent compliment with a concealed sting

huzzlecoo – an intimate talk; a confidential colloquy

kipe – to inspect critically; to appraise pragmatically

cow’cat – a person whose main function is to occupy space

frime – an educated heart; one who deserves the right thing

I discovered Gelett Burgess through A Little Sister of Destiny, a book published in 1906 that I found in an antique store a century later. (Just discovered that it’s been republished this year. Highly recommended!) I loved it so much that I started a modern-day retelling of Miss Million’s tale. I hope to complete it one day.

 


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#Writer’sQuoteWednesday & #BeWow 

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Ruffle Some Feathers: Shine

You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.
– Madeleine L’Engle

Madeleine L’Engle is best known for a Wrinkle in Time and other YA books which featured strong girl protagonists and characters that today would be defined with labels or diagnoses. She also wrote novels for adults. I love almost everything L’Engle wrote, but particularly, her four-book autobiographical series called The Crosswick Journals, about her time balancing her creative, family, and community life.

Every so often I need out—away from all these people I love most in the world—in order to regain a sense of proportion.
– Madeleine L’Engle in A Circle of Quiet

Madeleine’s gentle spirit shines throughout her writing, so I was delighted to discover the quote I chose for this Writer’s Quote Wednesday.

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Marianne Williamson’s best known quote elaborates on the sentiment.

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I am remembering to SHINE. It’s the right thing to do.


#Writer’sQuoteWednesday & #BeWow010516_2129_writersquot1

After I posted, the following came across my feed:

12 Fantastic Facts About ‘A Wrinkle in Time’

6. MEG MURRY WAS ONE OF SCIENCE FICTION’S FIRST GREAT FEMALE PROTAGONISTS…

… and that scared publishers even more. L’Engle believed that the relatively uncommon choice of a young heroine contributed to her struggles getting the book in stores.

Nevertheless, the author stood by her heroine and consistently promoted acceptance of one’s unique traits and personality. When A Wrinkle in Time won the 1963 Newbury Award, L’Engle used her acceptance speech to decry forces working for the standardization of mankind, or, as she so eloquently put it, “making muffins of us, muffins like every other muffin in the muffin tin.” L’Engle’s commitment to individualism contributed to the very future of science fiction. . .

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Coronal Mass Emission

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of an X1.1 class flare in the early hours of Nov. 10, 2013. The image represents light with a wavelength of 131 Angstroms, which is typically colorized in teal. Image Credit: NASA/SDO

the sun flares
emitting radiation
across the electromagnetic spectrum
spewing 
gas
light
energy

my heart quivers
unleashing cascades
spanning transgalactic lifetimes 
sending
waves
typhoons
thunderbolts

roiling through cells and gels
rattling the web that is me

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Fantasy, or Magical Reality

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Past lives. Parallel universes. Psychic phenomenon. To some, these are beliefs of the deluded and misguided. To others, they are inadequate descriptors of unseen forces at play in the universe.

Paranormal Phenomena in Fiction

How do we address metaphysical, mysterious occurrences in fiction? As a reader interested in awareness-expanding fiction, I enjoy the genres of Fantasy, Magical Realism, and Visionary Fiction — thought none of these fully encompasses of what I want to read, and what I’m writing.

 

The wish not to believe can influence as strongly as
the wish to believe.
~ Ian Stevenson, M.D.

Fantasy is described as being not scientifically feasible, and therein is my objection to calling Spinning Stardust (my WIP) fantasy. Science is a work in progress. There are many phenomena I’m not prepared to discard as unfeasible.

Reading is one of my favorite ways of crossing the bridge between the visible and invisible. I’d love to expand my reading list. What have you read that opened your mind to ideas that seem impossible?

I am compliling a list of scientific sources that validate metaphysical phenomenon, including past lives, parallel universes, and psychic abilities. If these topics interest you, please stop by and contribute.

It is not more surprising to be born twice than once;
everything in nature is resurrection.
~ Voltaire

 

010516_2129_writersquot1Inspired by:

Silver Threading #WQW Writer’s Quote Wednesday

Ronowan Writes #BeWoW Be Wonderful on Wednesday; Be Writing on Wednesday


Sources

There Is a Paranormal Activity Lab at the University of Virginia: Respected scientists are lending credibility to parapsychological research (FEB 10, 2014; The Atlantic)
by JAKE FLANAGIN

Ian Stevenson’s Case for the Afterlife: Are We ‘Skeptics’ Really Just Cynics? (NOV 2, 2013; Scientific American Blogs)
by Jesse Bering

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Ode to my Throat Chakra

Today, inspired by an amazing writers’ conference with the Capitol City Writers and their Finish the Damn Book track, I am writing. Here’s an invocation I wrote a few months ago, encouraging my creativity to flow.

 

Sapphire blue vibration,
Let your pulsing be key
Unlocking songs, poems, and stories
Dwelling inside of me.

The rest of my prayer/blessing/cry for help is here: Ode to my Throat Chakra

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