Weaving Gold

Mokosha, Anastasia Sophia, and Me, Natalia . . . while the books are written

Ukrainian Fire Myths, Beliefs, and Superstitions

iu-2Hutsul Beliefs about Fire

Source: У що вірили гуцули: звичаї, традиції та вірування

The attitude of the highlnaders toward fire is especially reverent. Signs and superstitions concerning fire are many.

  • Going out onto the mountain glad with the flock, the shepherds should also ignite the so-called living fire: the flame is extracted by rubbing together two pieces of soft wood. The bonfire must be maintainted the whole time they are on the glade.
  • If bread is passed over a fire to a child, he or she will surely grow up a thief.
  • If someone spits into a fire, a blister will form on his tongue.
  • It is considred a sin to throw hair into the fire.
  • When the fire in the oven is cracking loudly, the Hutsul will say that an angry person will come into the house.

A Ukrainian Fire Legend

Source: UkrainianBooks.com Про Вогонь

The fire of one master found itself with the fire of another master, and they began to speak amongst themselves. The first says: “Life is good with my master, for he treats me well – when needed, he lays some kindling, and not needed, he takes a clean water and douses me. So it is good for me.” The second says: “For me, things are bad, for my master gives me poor quality firewood, and when I am not needed, pours washwater over me. I want to make him aware that I shall walk over his farm.” The first one says: “When you walk, do not burn the wheels of my master, which are found in your master’s yard.”

And so it happened that at night, a fire started at the homestead of the second master, and everything burned down, but the wheel of the first master rolled away and survived.

Do you know other Ukrainian fire lore? Beliefs from other traditions? I’d love to hear. Comment below.
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Mokosha

unknownAn embroidery of Mokosha (also Makosh, Mokosh, et al) is used as a talisman to help in the manifestation of dreams and for protection from negative forces. Mokosha ancient eastern Slavic goddess, patroness of handwork and other traditionally women’s skills and talents.

Mokosha is a patroness of the lady of the house, contributes to the prosperity of her home, and rewards zealous work. This amulet does not have to be carried on the person, but should be found in the house of the mistress whose it protects.

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Creation in Six Words

Alla blew multi-hued sparkles into materiality.

flower-girl-necklace-sprinkle-dust-gift-magical-wedding-fairytale-fairy-tale-pendant-jewelry-sparkly-silver-star-white-gift-magic-new.jpg

 

I stumbled onto Ronowan’s Haiku Challenge and dipped my toe into the WordPress writers’ community. Clicking and reading, I discovered great writers and fun challenges. The above is in response to the magnificently named Sometimes Stellar Storyteller’s Six-Word Story Challenge. It is inspired by a scene in the second volume of The Weaving Gold Chronicles (my WIP), wherein Talitha is learning to create creatures, plants, and crystals.

Reading the replies is illuminating. As I learn how other writers transmit emotion in three lines or tell a story in a few words, my writing improves.

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Meeting Talitha

I lay on the floor of my living room in Wisconsin, a phone headset covering my ears. My friend Kelly was on the other end of the line, doing energy healing for me.

“What do you see?” she asked.

My eyes were closed, but I saw. I smelled. I heard. I was immersed in the a scene that was definitely not 2009 Wisconsin.

“A little girl. She looks about seven. She’s wearing a dirty, white tunic. There is dust in the air. It’s hard to breathe.”

“What is she doing?”

I see the girl on her knees, scraping at the dirt.

“She’s burying something. A doll.”

“Do you know her name?”

I strain to figure it out, to ask her.

“I think it’s Talitha,” I reply. But I start doubting myself immediately. Did my brain make up this name, Talitha, because it shares sounds and letters with my given name?

The healing session ends. I Google “Talitha” and the search engine produces few results, but Wikipedia does have a short entry.

Talitha is an uncommon feminine name meaning “little girl” in Aramaic, given in reference to the Biblical story in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus Christ was said to have resurrected a dead child with the words “Talitha cumi” or “Talitha kum” or “Talitha koum,” meaning “Little girl, I say to you, arise!”

My world rocked. Kelly and I had been working on healing my Inner Child.


My writing practice was dormant for many months. I am delighted that the energy has shifted and I am called to write. Talitha and Anastasia Sophia have not been telling me their stories, but the urge to write returned and I am willing to play.

To stay inspired and stay on track, I signed up for Julie Tallard Johnson‘s On-line Class, In The Spirit of WritingI’ve worked with Julie in a year-long program before and highly recommend her excellent coaching.


Meet Talitha by clicking the Talitha button on the right.

Click for excerpts of Talitha’s story.

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